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egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look at cairo today, it doesn't seem like it. the demonstrations are continuing. so are clashes. about an hour and a half ago clashes taking place right where we are behind us at the hotel we're staying at. security forces clashing with protesters. a number of protesters ambushed a police vehicle carrying riot police. the police took off. the protesters got ahold of this truck, set it on fire. more security forces came in, shot tear gas and disbursed the protesters. we've seen similar clashes throughout the day. all the demonstrators angry after president morsi declared some controversial decrees that temporaril
's president, mohamed morsi is saying that israel's aggression, as he calls it, against gaza will end in a few hours. our reza sayeh is there. we'll get an update from him this breaking story. we're right on the other side of this break with his report. >>> welcome back. breaking news to get to. we were hearing and we are waiting for a report from reza sayeh, what egypt's president mohamed morsi is now saying. he is saying that id real's aggression, as he calls it, against gaza will end some time today, maybe in a few hours and that egyptian-mediated efforts will produce positive results. reza sayeh is reporting for us on this issue. he joins us live. so, back up and give us some detail. is mohamed morsi really the person who would be able to effectively say that this aggression now ends? >> reporter: well, it's tough to say. what we do know is that it's intelligence officials in egypt that are apparently leading the negotiations and the man who is doing it is mohammed mashat. in 2011 he helped to negotiate the release of israeli soldier, which suggests this egyptian spy chief has pretty stron
got the egyptian president, mohamed morsi to be the address if hamas breaks the ceasefire and begins firing rockets into israel again, that egypt will be responsible, and will be held responsibility, they have taken responsibility, but this is a verbal agreement, this is not a written agreement, there is no implementation mechanism in place, this is really just a cooling-off period. to see if negotiators can really get at the root issues that are the smuggling tunnels for weapons coming in to the gaza strip, many from iran and the sinai desert, and whether hamas will be disarmed in the end. lou: the stubborn choice for both, palestinians and the israelis, the right to govern themselves, versus the right assurance guaranteed security. how surprising is it, to you, that israel would agree to this ceasefire on the same day a bomb goes off in tel aviv? >> well, it was quite surprising to me, lou, last time there was a terror attack in tel tel avivs who, 006, was in 2006, i remember, i was covering those bombings, so, usually what would happen after such an incident, israel would respond,
power. mohamed morsi decreed that all his decisions are final and not subject to appeal or review. he also ordered the retrial of former president hosni mubarak for the killing of protesters during the revolution. some egyptians protested morsi's action today, accusing him and the muslim brotherhood of seizing too much power. president obama spent the holiday at the white house. he phoned 10 american service men and women in afghanistan to thank them for their sacrifice. at a u.s. base in kabul, troops feasted on 200 turkeys and the trimmings. about 66,000 americans are still deployed in afghanistan. most are expected home by the end of 2014. as we reported here last night, america's ambassador to the united nations, susan rice, has broken her silence about the controversial remarks she made back in september about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. ambassador chris stevens and three other americans were killed in that attack. sharyl attkisson in washington has more on that tonight. sharyl. >> reporter: ambassador rice defended her comment from more than nine weeks a
is not the old dictatorship but the country's first elected president, mohamed morsi who they accuse of overreaching himself before i assuming sweeping new powers. >> egypt and the u.s. have a very important relationship. what side is the obama administration taking in this crisis? >> reporter: well, u.s. criticism so far has been extremely muted. some people here in egypt are disappointed by that. the u.s. government is really in a tricky situation because it's relying on president morsi to help with peace efforts in the israeli-palestinian conflict. last week he helped broker a truce between hamas and israel. so we're back in the same situation we had under the old dictatorship which is that the u.s. can't be to overtly critical because it relies on egypt's help here in the middle east. >> holly williams in cairo for us this morning. thank you so much. let's take a quick break. when we come back the latest on the civil war in syria including a report from one city at the center of the conflict. later, would be millionaires line up for a chance at tonight's historic powerball lotter
-fire's holding so far. >> and you thank egypt's president mohamed morsi for that? >> he is so far now proving to be a constructive partner certainly as proven in this last operation. >> is he honoring the peace treaty with israel? >> i think there's peace between egypt and israel on a daily basis, yes. >> what about syria? what would you like to see the government of israel as far as syria is concerned? because it's intense what's going on right now. about 40,000 people have been killed over the past year and a half. >> it's horrible. it's a terrible tragedy. we, the people of israel, look at the people of syria with great respect, even awe standing up and risking and even giving their lives for freedom from the terrible bashar al assad regime. we want them to go. we've long wanted him to depart. he is an ally of iran. he has not only killed 40,000 of his own people, he's tried to make a secret nuclear military program, he's helped in providing tens and tens of thousands of missiles to terrorists in lebanon and gaza. he is a loose cannon. we want him gone. we want to see a democratic and peac
, the principles of the 2011 revolution is in jeopardy, and they believe its current president mohammed morsi who has put those principles in jeopardy. all this outrage and fury as the outcome of a set of decrees suddenly announced on thursday night. these give them sweeping powers and it seems to be an effort to push through the drafting of egypt's all new constitution. one of the decrees says that no one, not even the judiciary can overturn and appeal any of mr. morsi's declarations, decisions since he took office in june. this order seems to be put in place until a parliament is in place. several months from now. technically this is a man who can do whatever he wants for the next few months without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, fredricka, that people here are outraged about. they're describe this as a power grab by mr. morsi. does it seem that most people understand that and does it make a difference at all? >> reporter: no. they reject that position by mr. morsi, and that explains the outrage. dramatic scenes in tahrirr square, including alexandria and port sayid. these are remini
, opponents rallied against mohamed morsi, he met with the senior judges monday trying to quiet the dispute over his effort to assume near absolute power. holly williams is in cairo. good morning holly. >> reporter: good morning, charlie and norah. he met with several senior judges and told them that one of his new powers immuneity from the court would only apply to sovereign matters. the problem is that we don't know exactly what that means. it certainly won't satisfy his opponents. they're holding a large demonstration today in tahrir square, right behind me. you'll remember the square from last year's egyptian revolution which ousted the country's long-time dictator. one of the organizers of today's demonstration told me he is expecting half a million people. that seems ambitious. at the moment there are only a few thousand people out. some of president's morsi's supporters were planning a gathering but canceled that because they were afraid of clashes. we may see more violent confrontations as we have over the last few days. norah, charlie? >> holly, thanks. >>> hum
nearby israeli cities with mostly ineffectually are homemade. >> jennifer: okay. so mohammed morsi the egyptian president has emerged as you have identified, as we have, too, as the central figure in these talks. do you think that role, that elevation diminishes the u.s.'s role in middle east peace negotiations? and is that a good thing? >> well, i don't think it diminishes the u.s. role because egypt under morsi and israel under netanyahu are really far apart. so they do need a mediator. the united states is viewed in the region as not a reliable mediator. as being way too pro israeli but to the extent that the united states can lubricate things and i mean hillary clinton now is acting as an intermediary between israel and egypt and carrying messages back and forth the way kissinger used to carry messages back and forth between sidot and baggen. the u.s. has a prominent role. the terms on which this crisis might end are ones that will be negotiated between egypt and israel. i think what israel wants is simila
passage of a new constitution. all across egypt this evening, people watched as president mohamed morsi spoke to state television interviewers addressed the nation. he defended his decision to grant himself powers free from judicial review. >> ( translated ): my responsibility is to protect this nation from any conspiracy or from any attempt to go backwards. as the country's president my responsibility, is to achieve justice and respect the laws and to lay down many rules in the absence of parliament until they convene and are able to vote on behalf of the people. >> brown: the islamist president also criticized the outpouring of protests against his actions. on tuesday, at least 200,000 people filled cairo's tahrir square, accusing morsi and his muslim brotherhood of hijacking last year's revolution. liberal and secular groups also condemned a move to fast-track a final vote on a new constitution. >> ( translated ): we want a constitution that represents all egyptian people, not one that represent a certain faction of egyptians. >> ( translated ): the constitutional panel tasked to >>
throughout the week about what the new president, mohammed morsi has done, a member of the islamic brotherhood, is egypt the next iran that the united states now has to fear? melissa: well it could be. morsi frankly is consolidating power and he is squeezing out the minority, and the minorities are the christians, the liberals and secularists many of whom are in the square right now. the constituent assembly writing this constitution you referred to earlier, the liberals and the secularists and christians have long left to participate in that because they were being frozen out of the process. so it's, it is questionable the value of this document and whether it will accommodate some of the rights and social and political justices that the people in that square are wanting. bill: many people consider morsi to be moving along that line. i mean do you see it yourself? or do you see him holding back from that? melissa: well i think he is probably going to pull back a little bit. i would like to belief the administration and state department is working certainly, you know, off the media
. >>> in the streets of egypt today, scenes just like this one. two sides clashing over president mohamed morsi's decision to grant himself sweeping new powers. the violent protests played out behind closed doors, morsi met with egypt's top judges to explain his move. these are the same judges who are now banned from overturning any decision he makes until a new constitution is finalized. >>> israel, a country in the midst of very fragile cease-fire with hamas, and now also its own political upheaval, long time israeli defense minister ehud barak making the surprise announcement he's quitting. he says he wants to spend more time with his family and make room for new political figures. here he was. >> translator: i feel it is important that other people should take leading positions in israel. change is in the positions of power is a good thing. there are many ways to contribute to society and the country. and not necessarily through politics. >> barak says he will see out his term, staying on as defense minister until a new cabinet is formed next january. barak played a cruel role as a key oppo
for life. only from aveeno. egypt's tahrir square. they say that they are going to stay there until mohamed morsi gave back the powers that he took himself days ago. liberates and moderates feel that he's trying to push the democracy back into dictatorship. president morsi says it will remain this way until the constitution is finalized. i want to bring in reza sayeh. first of all, give us a feeling of what is happening on the streets and how people feel about where they are in this. >> reporter: well, protesters are still here, nowhere near the numbers of the 1 million demonstration last night. but we have a whole bunch of other collision courses taking shape, suzanne, that could complicate this. here's why. president morsi wants the new constitution drafted immediately. 100-member panel has been designed to write this new constitution but there's been a whole lot of problems and conflict. the panel is dominated by supporters of the muslim brotherhood, islamists. many liberal members have quit and protested. >> reza, we have breaking news. senator bob corker, a republican from tennessee re
.s. embassy in cairo. there are thousands back in the street and they are angry, demanding president mohammed morsi, the new president step down. steve harrigan streams live in cairo, it is nightfall now. what do we know about the u.s. embassy, steve? >> the u.s. embassy building is really just down the block from where i'm standing here and egypt security forces have put up a 12-foot high call of cinder block to keep that alleyway safe where the embassy is. the public services section which visitors use is closed today. that part of it is closed off. the embassy itself has not been targeted but it is part of a rough taeub rough neighborhood around tahrir square where protestors are throwing rocks and police are firing teargas. two buildings were set on fire, those blazes are now out. warnings issued to all americans to avoid the downtown area over the next few days due to the unrest, bill. bill: when will the new egyptian president morsi speak, do we know that, steve? >> reporter: we expect to hear from him on national television later tonight in a taped address. he's likely to introduce a n
as demonstrators threaten egypt's new islamic president mohamed morsi with a second revolution. with all this going on president morsi is on the cover of "time" magazine. last hour i talked with one of the reporters who talked with morsi in this exclusive interview. and i asked carl vick why "time" is calling him the most porpt man in the middle east. >> one, he's sort of central to what they call a new sunni access these counts a counterweight to iran emerging thinking of qatar in the gulf and turkey certainly. and egypt has always been the largest most populous arab country, it's always been sort of the anchor. if you're the president of egypt, by default you probably should be the most important person in the middle east. right now the circumstances also are favoring morsi. and the other reason is because he holds the sort of future of egypt in his hands right now and of the revolution with what he does in the coming couple of months. >> uh-huh. and another new development to tell you about today. egyptian lawmakers dominated by islamists are now rushing to draft a new constitution. this move is
of references to islamic sharia law. in cairo, tens of thousands protested, denouncing president mohammed morsi. in an all-night session of parliament dominated by islamic. opposition groups say that the document has a clear view towards sharia law. raising fears of state enforced islamic moral code. the draft is expected to be delivered to president morsi tomorrow. new controversy today over a pension crisis running the state of illinois. and whether american taxpayers and all the other states may soon have to put their bill. according to the pew research center, illinois has the most underfunded public pension system in the entire country. the funding ratio of just 45%. 45% funded. estimated $95 billion short of where they need to be to pay out the promised pension. a problem that pat quinn says needs to be fixed to find a solution. it is harder to come by. here is a video that we just released. the governor squeezing the pension python. >> sometimes they make smaller payments than what they promise. the investments that we made with that pension fund, the great recession can hit us hard. plu
almost two years ago, the demonstrators are voicing their anger with president mohamed morsi after what some are calling an unprecedented power grab. cnn's reza sayah is joining us from cairo once again. reza, we're hearing about attacks against several muslim brotherhood offices in egypt. what do you know about that? >> reporter: according to the brotherhood spokesperson, two of their offices were attacked by anti-morsi protesters. the brotherhood says the protesters were carrying molotov cocktails, clubs and knives and destroyed and heavily damaged these offices. remember, muslim brotherhood had called for a one-million-man demonstration of their own today to rival the opposition's demonstrations. late last night they called it off to avoid violence. but in these two particular cities north of cairo, they didn't avoid violence. >> reza, we're also seeing and i want to show our viewers some live pictures from tahrir square in cairo not far from where you are right now. you were there earlier in the day. who are these protesters? and there are huge numbers there. we see the tents. what'
. on the level of politics, the election of president mohamed morsi was truly a landmark event in egypt's political history. he was the first civilian elected to the office of the presidency in egypt. he is also the first islamist to be elected as head of state in any arab country in free and fair elections. and that the islamist movement in question of course is the most impressive by far, the largest and most well-established islamist movement in the world of political islam. so truly momentous change on the level of politics. however, i would argue on the level of policy, we have much more durability, much more consistency. and the reasons for that are numerous, and a don't want to get too much into that, of course can discuss this in the q. and a session but just to point out that this is rooted in a number of factors. first of all, resiliency of egypt's institutions, the military and national security bureaucracy, a judiciary have all remained to a certain level very cohesive out what has been a very turbulent transition. now, all of these of course have afforded egypt really a mea
mohamed morsi's move to consolidate his power. the muslim brotherhood is supporting nationwide rallies to support the president. the new constitution meantime says it has almost finished its final draft. and the e.p.a. is temporarily banning bp from competing for new government contracts. in the wake of the 2010 gulf oil spill, the agency says it is taking action because of bp's "lack of business integrity." as of february bp had $9 billion in contracts with the feds. bp it expects this ban to be lifted shortly. and the manager who oversaw apple's flawed maps program on its new iphone has been fired. rich williamson was fired just before the thanksgiving holiday. he had been with apple for about a decade. the flawed maps app forced ceo tim cook to issue a public apology after the iphone's debut in september. and if you've ever dreamed of an intimate dinner with betty white, well here is your chance. a los angeles chapter of the society for the prevention of cruel tito animals is auctioning off a date with the actress. the winner will join white and the spca's president for dinner. the
early this morning. the documents will be presented tomorrow to president mohammed morsi for his signature. reza sayah is overlooking tahrir square. we understand they are planning what they are calling a million man demonstration that has been called. give us a sense why are people still protest and what do we expect in the next 24 hours, the days to come? >> reporter: well, they're protesting because they're angry with president morsi, his dekoreas and how the drafting of this constitution has unfolded, and there doesn't soop seem to be an end to the protest. they're back here in big numbers. tens of thousands of them here in tahrir square. we're going to show you what it looks like at this hour. i think one of the outcomes of the 2011 egyptian revolution was that egyptians became very good in protesting, so it doesn't matter what people are fighting for here. it seems they like to come out and free-throws the opposition factions that are back here in tahrir. these are the liberals, the seculars. we were just down there. we saw a lot of women, women's rights activists who don't
this morning. the document will be presented to president mohamed morsi tomorrow for his signature. egyptians will vote on the draft in two weeks. >>> wow. in syria, as the internet goes dark, a is the u.s. closer to arming the rebels and is time out for bashar al assad? jim clancy is next. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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